Re: Amerindian navigators and Eurocentrism in scholarship


From WWallace@freedom.org (William Wallace)
Date Thu, 11 Sep 1997 19:00:14 GMT
Newsgroups sci.archaeology.mesoamerican, sci.archaeology, sci.anthropology, alt.folklore.science
Organization MindSpring Enterprises
References <5uvasm$n7p$1@titan.globalserve.net > <bortiz-0709972340280001@ip187.birmingham4.mi.pub-ip.psi.net > <5v2mo9$jpc$1@titan.globalserve.net > <Pine.A41.3.96.970910150050.102612A-100000@lucia.u.arizona.edu > <5v7uj4$l3p$1@titan.globalserve.net >

On 11 Sep 1997 05:12:04 GMT, yuku@globalserve.net (Yuri Kuchinsky
17784) wrote:

>Jeffrey L Baker (jbaker@U.Arizona.EDU) wrote:
>: On 9 Sep 1997, Yuri Kuchinsky 17784 wrote:

>: > The fact is that the Natives had those skills. This is beyond doubt.
>Even : > the brutal Spanish colonialists accepted this! And what our
>enlightened : > professors object to? That in my post I gave no footnotes
>-- and therefore : > this didn't happen! What kind of logic is this? Whole
>reams of footnotes : > have been posted already -- did they pay attention.
>Noooo!  : >

>: When has anyone on this group ever said the natives didn't have very
>: advanced capabilities.

>Well, they're saying that the Natives didn't have these skills to build
>ships and to navigate the ocean. This is false and diminishes Amerindian
>achievements. 

        Interestingly there was a stone found in a mound that is in fact
a piece of the moon. Therefore we are denigrating their achievements
in space exploration. 

        I fail to see the difference. 


=====
Any sufficiently convoluted argument can be made to appear to be science
as the layman equates incomprehensibility with science.


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